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Accelerator and F# (II.): The Game of Life on GPU

In the previous article, I introduced the Microsoft Research Accelerator library. It allows us to write computations with arrays in C# and execute them in parallel on multi-core CPU or more interestingly, using GPU shaders. In the previous artcile, we've seen how Accelerator works and how it can be accessed from F#. In this article, we'll look at one more interesting F# demo - we'll implement the famous Conway's Game of Life [1] using Accelerator. We'll use a v2 version of Accelerator which has been announced just recently and is available from Microsoft Connect [2].

This article is the second one from a series about using Accelerator from F#. Today, we'll use Accelerator types directly from F# - this is the simplest possible approach and is very similar to the way you'd work with Accelerator in C#. However, we can use some nice F# features such as custom operators to make the code more readable. In the next article, we'll discuss a different approach - we'll look how to execute more "standard" F# code (that doesn't reference Accelerator explicitly) with Accelerator using F# quotations. The list of articles may change, but here is a list of articles that I'm currently planning to write:

Published: Monday, 28 December 2009, 9:16 PM
Tags: academic, functional, meta-programming, accelerator, f#, math and numerics
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Accelerator and F# (I.): Introduction and calculating PI

Calculating Pi using Monte-Carlo

I already wrote about two projects that I worked on during an internship at MSR back in 2007 (ASP.NET support in F# and F# WebTools). Even though this was more than 2 years ago (and I did one more internship at MSR in the meantime), I still have one more project that I never published on the web. The folks from the F# team reminded me of this project recently, so I thought I could finally publish it. The project used Microsoft Research Accelerator [1, 2], which is a C# library for developing array-based computations and executing them on a GPU. More recently, the Accelerator team at MSR published Accelerator v2 [3], which was a good motivation to update my original project...

In this article, we'll look at the simplest way of using Accelerator from F#. Accelerator provides a managed interface that can be naturally used from both C# and F#. We can use a mix of method calls and overloaded operators to describe a computation. In F#, we'll also define our additional custom operators to make the code a bit nicer. After we introduce Accelerator using a simple C# demo, we'll look how to calculate an approximate value of the PI number using a Monte-Carlo method.

This article is the first one from a series about using Accelerator from F#. The list of articles may change, but here is a list of articles that I'm currently planning to write:

Published: Monday, 21 December 2009, 3:21 AM
Tags: functional, academic, meta-programming, accelerator, f#, math and numerics
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Real-World Functional Programming: Completed and printed!

If you're following my blog or if you're interested in F# or functional programming in .NET, you probably noticed that I was working on a book Real-World Functional Programming. At some point, we called it Functional Programming for the Real-World, but then we changed the title back to a better sounding version Real-World Functional Programming (subtitle With examples in F# and C#). The book is also reason for a lower number of blog posts over the last year. Over the last month or so, we were doing the final edits, reviewing the final PDF version (I fixed quite a lot minor issues, synchronized book with the Beta 2 F# release and so on). Anyway, before a few days, I received the following email (as an author, I receive the same emails as those who ordered the book through the Manning Early Access Program, so that I can see what we're sending to our dear readers):

Dear Tomas Petricek,
We are pleased to announce that Real-World Functional Programming is now complete! As a MEAP subscriber you can download your copy of the finished ebook right now! (...) This ebook is the final version, identical to the softbound edition, which is currently being printed and will be available on December 24. If you chose the printed book option when you originally subscribed, we'll ship it to you automatically—no action required from you.

Finally finished!

Yes, that's right. The book is finally completed and as far as I know, it has been printed last week! If you already ordered the book, you won't receive it before Christmas, but it should come shortly after. I can't wait to see the book actually printed. The transition from the Word drafts I initially wrote to a final PDF version was already felt fantastic and I thought "It looks like a real book!" Among other things, there are now graphical arrows with comments inside listings, which looks really great and makes code listings much easier to read. Now I can look forward to seeing the actual book. Maybe I'm too conservative, but I have to say that I'm really glad that I wrote the book before everything is going to be published just electronically!

Here is a couple of links that you may found interesting if you want to look inside the book...

Published: Saturday, 19 December 2009, 9:54 PM
Tags: functional, random thoughts, universe, writing
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