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The Timeless Way of Programming

Figure 1. The Timeless Way of Building - Christopher Alexander

Many programmers know the name of the architect Christopher Alexander for his work on design patterns that has been adapted into the world of programming. A lot of people know of the, sometimes ridiculed, patterns like strategy (functions!) or visitor (pattern matching!) and some have read the Gang of Four design patterns book that introduced them. A few people know of the Patterns of Software book by Richard P. Gabriel, which is a much more profound reflection on software inspired by the work of Christopher Alexander. And almost nobody has actually read Christopher Alexander's books. (Thanks in advance for reminding me on Twitter that I am mistaken...)

I read Alexander's Notes on the Synthesis of Form a couple of years ago, and used it as one of the sources for ideas in my recent Onward! essay on architecture, design and urban planning, but I did not know his other work. Only recently, after Christopher Alexander died, I finally ordered two books that are most directly about design patterns, The Timeless Way of Building and A Pattern Language.

This post is a somewhat unorganized collection of thoughts triggered by reading of The Timeless Way of Building, including my understanding of Alexander's work, some critical thoughts and on the applications of his ideas to software.

Published: Thursday, 1 September 2022, 2:03 AM
Tags: academic, research, programming languages, architecture, design
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Software designers, not engineers: An interview from alternative universe

While the physicists investigate the nature of the mysterious portal that has recently appeared in North London, several human beings recently came through the portal, which appears to be a gate into an alternative universe. As we understood from the last two people coming through the portal, it seems to be a linked with a universe that is in many ways like ours, reached about the same level of social and technological development, but differs in numerous curious details. The paths through which people in this alternative universe reached similar results as our world are often subtly different.

The most recent visitor from the alternative universe is Ms Zaha Atkinson, who would most likely be titled software engineer in our world, although the title she uses in her home world is software designer. She is a well-known software designer and has been also titled using the strange-sounding title softwarenova, a label that we will soon say more about. As with other technological and societal developments, the alternative universe seems to have arrived at very similar results as our worlds. Software is eating the (alternative) world, but it is built in very different ways. The interview with Ms Zaha Atkinson, presented below, reveals how very different the world of software is when we think of programmers as software designers rather than as software engineers.

This article is a work of fiction. Any resemblance to actual events or persons, living or dead, may or may not be entirely coincidental. It has been largely inspired by the book Designerly Ways of Knowing by Nigel Cross. Ms Zaha Atkinson also may or may not be entirely fictional.

Published: Monday, 19 April 2021, 2:30 PM
Tags: academic, research, design, philosophy, architecture
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On architecture, urban planning and software construction

Despite having the term science in its name, it is not always clear what kind of discipline computer science actually is. Research on programming is sometimes like science, sometimes like mathematics, sometimes like engineering, sometimes like design and sometimes like art. It also has a long tradition of importing ideas from a wide range of other disciplines.

In this article, I will look at ideas from architecture and urban planning. Architecture has already been an inspiration for design patterns, although some would say that we did quite poor job and imported a trivialized (and not very useful) version of the idea. However, there are many other interesting ideas in architecture and urban planning worth exploring.

To explain why learning from architecture and urban planning is a good idea, I will first discuss similarities between problems solved by architects or urban planners and programmers. I will then look at a number of concrete ideas that we can learn, mostly taking inspiration from four books that I've read recently. There are two general areas:

The nature of problems that programmers face are often more similar to the problems that architects and urban planners have to deal with than, say, the problems that scientists, engineers or mathematicians need to solve. We might not want to go all the way and completely rebuild how we do programming to mirror architecture and urban planning, but treating the ideas from those disciplines as equal to those from science or engineering will make programming richer and more productive discipline.

Published: Wednesday, 8 April 2020, 12:13 AM
Tags: academic, programming languages, philosophy, design, architecture
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