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The Gamma: Simple code behind interactive articles

There are huge amounts of data around us that we could use to better understand the world. Every company collects large amounts of data about their sales or customers. Governments and international organizations increasingly release interesting data sets to the public through various open government data initiatives (data.gov or data.gov.uk). But raw data does not tell you much.

An interesting recent development is data journalism. Data journalists tell stories using data. A data driven article is based on an interesting observation from the data, it includes (interactive) visualizations that illustrate the point and it often allows the reader to get the raw data.

Adding a chart produced in, say, Excel to an article is easy, but building good interactive visualization is much harder. Ideally, the data driven article should not be just text with static pictures, but a program that links the original data source to the visualization. This lets readers explore how the data is used, update the content when new data is available and change parameters of the visualization if they need to understand different aspect of the topic.

This is in short what I'm trying to build with The Gamma project. If you're interested in building better reports or data driven articles, continue reading!

I did a talk about The Gamma project at the fantastic Future Programming workshop at the StrangeLoop conference last week (thanks for inviting me!) and there is a recording of my 40 minute talk on YouTube, so if you prefer to watch videos, check it out!

Are you a data journalist or data analyst? We're looking for early partners! I joined the EF programme to work on this and if the project sounds like something you'd like to see happen, please get in touch or share your contact details on The Gamma page!

Published: Monday, 28 September 2015, 5:07 PM
Tags: thegamma, type providers, data journalism, programming languages
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In the age of the web: Typed functional-first programming revisited

Most programming languages were designed before the age of web. This matters because the web changes many assumptions that typed functional language designers tak for granted. For example, programs do not run in a closed world, but must instead interact with (changing and likely unreliable) services and data sources, communication is often asynchronous or event-driven, and programs need to interoperate with untyped environments like JavaScript libraries.

How can statically-typed programming languages adapt to the modern world? In this article, I look at one possible answer that is inspired by the F# language and various F# libraries. In F#, we use type providers for integration with external information sources and for integration with untyped programming environments. We use lightweight meta-programming for targeting JavaScript and computation expressions for writing asynchronous code.

This blog post is a shorter version of a ML workshop paper that I co-authored earlier this year and you should see this more as a position statement. I'm not sure if F# and the solutions shown here are the best ones, but I think they highlight very important questions in programming language design that I very much see as unsolved.

The article has two sections. First, I'll go through a simple case study showing how F# can be used to build a client-side web widget. Then, I'll discuss some of the implications for programming language design based on the example.

Published: Wednesday, 9 September 2015, 5:14 PM
Tags: f#, type providers, web, functional programming, research
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F# Data: New type provider library

When F# 3.0 type providers were still in beta version, I wrote a couple of type providers as examples for talks. These included the WorldBank type provider (now available on Try F#) and also type provider for XML that infered the structure from sample.
For some time, these were hosted as part of FSharpX and the authors of FSharpX also added a number of great features.

When I found some more time earlier this year, I decided to start a new library that would be fully focused on data access in F# and on type providers and I started working on F# Data. The library has now reached a stable state and Steffen also announced that the document type providers (JSON, XML and CSV) are not going to be available in FSharpX since the next version.

This means that if you're interested in accessing data using F# type providers, you should now go to F# Data. Here are the most important links:

Before looking at the details, I would like to thank to Gustavo Guerra who made some amazing contributions to the library! (More contributors are always welcome, so continue reading if you're interested...)

Published: Thursday, 28 March 2013, 3:23 AM
Tags: open source, f#, f# data, type providers
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